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Douthat: Crime and different punishments

By Ross Douthat

New York Times News Service

Last week, the state of Arkansas, which had executed exactly nobody since 2005, put to death Ledell Lee for the crime of murdering Debra Reese in 1993. Why now — 11 years after the...

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