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Stanfield plant receives three citations for odors

After series of complaints, Stanfield Police issues three citations to 3D Idapro

By Jayati Ramakrishnan

East Oregonian

Published on February 7, 2018 8:43PM

Last changed on February 7, 2018 8:54PM

Stanfield Police have cited the pet food plant, owned by 3D Idapro Solutions, for odor three times in 2018. Each citation costs $435.

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Stanfield Police have cited the pet food plant, owned by 3D Idapro Solutions, for odor three times in 2018. Each citation costs $435.

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The Stanfield factory that prompted citizen complaints throughout 2017 has been cited by Stanfield Police for odor three times in 2018.

Stanfield Police Chief Bryon Zumwalt said the pet food plant, owned by 3D Idapro Solutions, has received three citations in the past few weeks, and that each citation costs $435.

Stanfield City Manager Blair Larsen said the plant had a court date for one citation last week, and for two others Wednesday.

“To my understanding, they pleaded no contest, and they have to make arrangements to pay the fines,” he said.

If the city receives at least four odor complaints from different households in a 12-hour period, it violates the city ordinance, and the city can issue a citation.

Mark Johnson, 3D Idapro’s vice president of operations, said the company had no comment about the citations.

Larsen said that in fall of 2017, plant operators struck an agreement with the city council, which allowed them until November to make all their improvements before they began issuing citations for odor complaints.

“They were a little delayed, but they got it done by mid-December,” Larsen said.

Larsen said the city has kept a log of the complaints they have received, which record the name and address of the complainant, the date and time it was received, and specific issues, if any.

According to the log, the first time the city received enough complaints to fit the nuisance ordinance was on Jan. 18. They received enough for two more citations on Jan. 20 and 22.

“It’s clear that the problem is not solved,” Larsen said. “Having the equipment is one thing. Using it properly and making sure people know how to use it is another.”

The plant, which dehydrates potatoes that are used primarily to make dog food, was the subject of many complaints this summer, when the odor forced many indoors. In October, officials from the company’s midwest headquarters held a public meeting in Stanfield to go over the plan they had to mitigate odors.

They said they had a three-step plan to mitigate odors, which included putting up a large tent in which potatoes could dry, which they said would reduce the odors to surrounding areas. They also planned to install a new scrubber, an air purifying device. The old scrubber was too small, and was damaged by a fire in the plant last February. The plant has since replaced the scrubber.



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