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Oklahoma tribes, lawmakers eye way toward sports betting

Oklahoma's Native American tribes are prepared to offer sports betting at some of the more than 100 casinos across the state, but so far the state's Legislature hasn't reached an agreement on how to do that

Published on June 5, 2018 8:10AM

Last changed on June 5, 2018 12:04PM

This May 21, 2018, photo shows the gaming floor at Riverwind Casino in Norman, Okla. Oklahoma's Native American tribes are prepared to offer sports betting at some of the more than 100 casinos across the state, but so far the state's Legislature hasn't reached an agreement on how to do that. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

The Associated Press

This May 21, 2018, photo shows the gaming floor at Riverwind Casino in Norman, Okla. Oklahoma's Native American tribes are prepared to offer sports betting at some of the more than 100 casinos across the state, but so far the state's Legislature hasn't reached an agreement on how to do that. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

In this May 21, 2018, photo, a man watches the off-track betting screens at Riverwind Casino in Norman, Okla. Oklahoma's Native American tribes are prepared to offer sports betting at some of the more than 100 casinos across the state, but so far the state's Legislature hasn't reached an agreement on how to do that. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

The Associated Press

In this May 21, 2018, photo, a man watches the off-track betting screens at Riverwind Casino in Norman, Okla. Oklahoma's Native American tribes are prepared to offer sports betting at some of the more than 100 casinos across the state, but so far the state's Legislature hasn't reached an agreement on how to do that. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)


OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) Oklahoma's Native American tribes are prepared to offer sports betting at some of the more than 100 casinos across the state, but so far the state's Legislature hasn't reached an agreement on how to do that.

Bills were introduced the last two years to pave the way for tribes to offer sports betting if there was a favorable ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court. But because the high court didn't reach its decision before the Legislature adjourned this year, lawmakers didn't feel much urgency to pass it.

One bill would have required casinos to pay a 10 percent fee on the "net win" for sports betting, which was estimated to bring the state about $10 million annually.

Republican leaders say they hope an agreement can be reached by February.



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