PENDLETON - Simon is a dog with a rich appetite.

John Bartron had carefully counted out the 20s, 10s and 5s and sealed them in plain white envelopes to pay his basketball referees the next morning for their week of work in Pendleton Youth Basketball games.

He had carefully stacked the envelopes beneath a schedule and his glasses before heading off to bed two weeks ago.

When he awoke the next morning, Bartron didn't have to turn on the lights to see scatters of white paper all over the floor.

He let out a "primal scream" after he realized that his standard poodle, Simon, had sniffed out his very own expensive evening meal.

Simon ate $230 in cash.

"He ate all but one $10 bill and one $5 bill," Bartron said. "He must of gotten full."

Needless to say, the referees didn't get paid that weekend.

Bartron said his wife, being an avid puzzle enthusiast, spent the next 12 hours following Simon with a colander when his stomach ache sent him outside to gag-up the cash.

By the end of the day, she had carefully pieced together most of the money.

It was that Monday when Bartron discovered another $5 bill and two ends of two $20 bills while attending to doggy-doodie duty.

Bartron had already known that if the remains of a bill include both serial numbers or two-thirds of the bill, the bank can replace the money.

Simon had eaten $43 a year ago.

The 6-year-old dog has always had a taste for light paper - tissues, paper towels and toilet paper.

"All of our bathroom cans have tops on them," he said. "I think it's all roughage for him."

But his love for money didn't truly develop until last year, Bartron said.

"It's kind of like escargot and caviar for him," he said.

While the incident did put off payment to Bartron's referees, there was one positive that came out of the situation.

Bartron had discovered an extra $1 in his search - a dollar earlier left on a table in Simon's reach.

"We wish it had laundered a little differently, but we got some returns," he said.

---

Reporter Teri Meeuwsen can be reached at (800) 522-0255 (ext. 1302 after hours) or by e-mail tmeeuwsen@eastoregonian.com.Staff photo by Don Cresswell

John Bartron and his standard poodle Simon pose with a picture and the amount of money, $230, the dog found on the family coffee table and ate. This is not the first time Simon has demonstrated expensive taste. In the foreground is some money he ate and Bartron recovered in the back yard.

Pooch polishes off a pile

By TERI MEEUWSEN

of the East Oregonian

PENDLETON - Simon is a dog with a rich appetite.

John Bartron had carefully counted out the 20s, 10s and 5s and sealed them in plain white envelopes to pay his basketball referees the next morning for their week of work in Pendleton Youth Basketball games.

He had carefully stacked the envelopes beneath a schedule and his glasses before heading off to bed two weeks ago.

When he awoke the next morning, Bartron didn't have to turn on the lights to see scatters of white paper all over the floor.

He let out a "primal scream" after he realized that his standard poodle, Simon, had sniffed out his very own expensive evening meal.

Simon ate $230 in cash.

"He ate all but one $10 bill and one $5 bill," Bartron said. "He must of gotten full."

Needless to say, the referees didn't get paid that weekend.

Bartron said his wife, being an avid puzzle enthusiast, spent the next 12 hours following Simon with a colander when his stomach ache sent him outside to gag-up the cash.

By the end of the day, she had carefully pieced together most of the money.

It was that Monday when Bartron discovered another $5 bill and two ends of two $20 bills while attending to doggy-doodie duty.

Bartron had already known that if the remains of a bill include both serial numbers or two-thirds of the bill, the bank can replace the money.

Simon had eaten $43 a year ago.

The 6-year-old dog has always had a taste for light paper - tissues, paper towels and toilet paper.

"All of our bathroom cans have tops on them," he said. "I think it's all roughage for him."

But his love for money didn't truly develop until last year, Bartron said.

"It's kind of like escargot and caviar for him," he said.

While the incident did put off payment to Bartron's referees, there was one positive that came out of the situation.

Bartron had discovered an extra $1 in his search - a dollar earlier left on a table in Simon's reach.

"We wish it had laundered a little differently, but we got some returns," he said.

Reporter Teri Meeuwsen can be reached at (800) 522-0255 (ext. 1302 after hours) or by e-mail tmeeuwsen@eastoregonian.com.

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