ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The western United States and eastern Asia will be treated this weekend to a rare solar spectacle when the moon slides across the sun, creating a “ring of fire.”

But scientists caution would-be viewers to be very careful because the sun’s damaging rays will remain powerful even during the annular solar eclipse. The advice: Either wear specially designed protective eyewear or attend a viewing event — at a planetarium or amateur astronomy club, for example — to avoid risk of serious eye injury.

The solar spectacle will first be seen in eastern Asia around dawn Monday, local time. Weather permitting, millions of early risers in southern China, northern Taiwan and southeast Japan will be able to catch the ring eclipse.

Then, the late day sun — on Sunday in the U.S. — will transform into a glowing ring in southwest Oregon, Northern California, central Nevada, southern Utah, northern Arizona and New Mexico and finally the Texas Panhandle.

Some online sites for viewing areas, with guidance on how best to observe the eclipse safely:

Fleischmann Planetarium at the University of Nevada, Reno: http://bit.ly/M5mV5b

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: http://www.omsi.edu/node/743

Eclipse-watch party in Eugene, hosted by the Astronomical Society: http:// www.eugeneastro.org/

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