Boardman City Park gets new picnic pavilion

The Boardman City Park has had a makeover of sorts. The park still boasts great baseball fields and a fun playground, but gone is the old wood-shingled gazebo.

It’s been replaced by a new 24-foot by 40-foot picnic pavilion. The pavilion, constructed by Cleary Building Corporation, was completed in July. It offers plenty of picnic space, along with electrical outlets and automatic lighting. Restrooms are near the pavilion.

The new structure makes the city park an ideal location for any large gathering, including parties or reunions.

City officials anticipate the new picnic pavilion will be in high demand, mostly during the summer months, so reservations are necessary.

Individuals wanting to reserve the picnic pavilion can do so by calling Marina Park at 541-481-7217. A $25 fee will be required for the reservation and a $40 cleaning fee will be assessed if the pavilion and surrounding area are not cleaned up after the event.

Two weeks’ notice is required when canceling the pavilion to receive a refund. The city also reminds users that no glass is allowed in the park at any time, and no bands, DJs or loud music will be permitted.

Hermiston vet provides rabies vaccinations in Boardman

A couple of other high notes on Boardman.

The city registered success with two recent events — dog licensing and rabies vaccination last Saturday and its noxious weed cleanup.

More than 30 dogs and cats were vaccinated at the low-cost clinic in the park by Dr. James Burgess of Country Animal Hospital from Hermiston. The city also provided no-cost licenses for dogs that live in the city. The American Cancer Society also was on hand, accepting donations for their cause with a doggie wash.

The city’s residents also collected 300 bags, or roughly 1,500 pounds, of puncturevine. Participants were paid a buck a bag.

We called ’em goatheads when I was kid. Goatheads are also how I learned to cuss. If you’ve stepped on a goathead when barefooted, you know what I mean.

Boardman code enforcement officer Keri?Jarmer said puncturevine can even penetrate shoes.

At any rate, the cleanup means the city streets, bike path, Marina Park’s walking path and other public areas are safer for bikes — and barefooted kids.

Where’s Umatilla County’s beef? At the state fair

It’s state fair time in Salem and that means Umatilla County is showing off its attractions and winning friends among fairgoers by serving up our local foods.

Of course, there will be watermelons from the west end, as well as other fruits and vegetables, but fairgoers enjoyed a special treat earlier this week — barbecued tri-tip beef. It makes my mouth water just to think about it.

Umatilla County Extension Agent Randy Mills, former Umatilla County Cattlemen’s president Ian Murdock and county Commissioner Bill Hansell served several hundred fairgoers.

Want to study wine? WWCC has new program

If you like wine — and I do — you might find this interesting.

The International Wine Guild announced this week that it has signed an agreement with Walla Walla Community College to begin teaching guild programs at WWCC through the college’s Center for Enology & Viticulture.

The Center for Enology and Viticulture provides students with hands-on experience in winemaking, viticulture practices, and wine sales. In addition to maintaining several acres of teaching vineyards, the center has created College Cellars, a state-of-the-art commercial teaching winery where students are responsible for winemaking and wine-related chemistry.

The guild will provide sommelier education as well as training for all aspects of the wine industry at WWCC.

The International Wine Guild has provided professionals a world-class wine education since 1998. The International Wine Guild was named one of the top five professional wine schools in the U.S. by both Food & Wine Magazine and The Wall Street Journal.

For more information go the Guild’s website at www.internationalwineguild.com. For more information on the Center for Enology and Viticulture visit its website at www.wwcc.edu/wine or www.collegecellars.com.

As the East Oregonian’s wine columnist, Rich Breshears (“One Rich Wine Guy”), says each week at the end of his column:

Cheers!

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