Legislators have it right to push a bill that would make it unlawful for insurance companies to use credit reports to consider someone's ability to purchase vehicle insurance, or any other kind of insurance for that matter. This information has no bearing on someone's driving record and it's just another example of invasion of privacy.

Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-John Day, is one of the biggest supporters of the bill that outlaws such access to people's credit reports. He rightfully stated that a person's financial history shouldn't matter to an insurance company. What does matter is their driving record and whether they pay their premiums.

Insurance companies claim there is a correlation between people with bad credit and those who turn in too many insurance claims. We believe such a sweeping statement cannot be substantiated.

Insurance companies use actuaries to compare and contrast all kinds of facts and figures, trying to limit the liability of their companies. That's understandable. But some information is marginal at best and always intrusive. That's the case with using credit reports for insurance purposes.

We support banning insurance companies from using such information to decide on rates or even if they are going to insure a person. A lot of facts need to be considered and no one wants insurance companies to be unfairly limited on protecting themselves, but invading someone's privacy for something that has no relevancy is inexcusable.

Let's hope this bill makes it through the Legislature and the governor signs it into law.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.