The Bear Fire, burning 15 miles east of Milton-Freewater, was reported to be 85 percent contained this morning by the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center. The fire has consumed 160 acres. All trails in the Walla Walla River drainage area are closed to the public.

The Monument Complex is only five percent contained, burning five miles north of Monument. So far, it's consumed an estimated 27,000 acres and is threatening 20 structures. The Red Cross is preparing to establish a shelter if needed in Monument. Five unoccupied buildings or outbuildings have been destroyed. Joani Bosworth of the Umatilla National Forest reported that structure protection is in place.

The fire crossed the North Fork John Day River Tuesday near Coyote Canyon and quickly spread through tall grass. An area closure has been implemented and includes all National Forest lands east of State Highway 207, south of Forest Road 21 and west of Ditch Creek. The one exception includes access to Bull Prairie Campground, which will remain open to the public.

The Fossil Creek fire, three miles north of the John Day Fossil Beds was 25 percent contained at 2,985 acres. Eight structures are threatened by the blaze.

Horse Heaven Complex, consisting of numerous fires within 40 miles of Prosser, Wash., is 95 percent contained. That group of fires has consumed more than 28,000 acres.

Juniper Canyon, 40 miles west of Milton-Freewater is 75 percent contained and has consumed 1,000 acres. The fire is in patrol status with crews checking its status daily.

Lightning moved across northeast Oregon Tuesday afternoon, starting four new fires in the region of the Wallowa-Whitman Forest which were quickly contained at less than one acre. One was on Bureau of Land Management protected land two miles southwest of Baker City.

Another was near Black Horse Creek on the upper Imnaha. The Oregon Department of Forestry had a small fire five miles northeast of Wallowa off Whiskey Creek Road.

Fire teams continue to manage the Battle Creek Complex located in Hells Canyon and the Cottonwood Fire about 35 miles north of Enterprise. The Rocky Mountain Area Incident Management team will take over the Trout Creek Fire today. Trout Creek is 20 miles southeast of Union in the Eagle Cap Wilderness.

The Cottonwood Creek fire has forced closure of Cold Springs Road from the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest boundary on the north to its junction with Forest Road 46 to the south.

The Trout Creek fire has forced the closure of West Eagle Meadow trail No. 1934 and connecting trail No. 1934. Also an all area closure covers a large area north of Forest Road 77 and from Prong Creek east to near Boulder Park.

The Battle Creek Complex has increased in size and was reported at having burned 8,730 acres and wasn't at all contained. The fire is being battled by air and land.

The Juniper Reservoir fire grew to an estimated 30,000 acres with heavy cloud cover and light winds helping reduce potential spread.

Burnout operations were successfully conducted for homes and outbuildings south of Beulah Reservoir late last night.

Burnout operations are also planned tonight for the fires northeast of Beulah. A team from Arizona is expected to arrive Thursday and be briefed by the teams already there before assuming command later that day. Some of the firefighters they'll relieve are from Ferguson Management of Pendleton.

The Egley Complex is 55 percent contained after consuming more than 203 square miles. It's located 10 miles north of Riley and is expected to be contained by Sunday. A total of 117 structures are threatened.

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